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done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
health care while talking about higher education and ongoing budget battle. >> more people without insurance gained shurngs, 3 million young americans have been able to stay on their parents plan, more than half a million americans and counting poised to get coverage started on january 1st. some for the very first time. it is these numbers, not the ones in any poll, that will ultimately determine the fate of this law. >> meanwhile, a source familiar with the program confirms to nbc news that 29,000 people signed up the newly repaired healthcare.gov sunday and monday, a figure that surpasses the total for the entire month of october. still not clear how many of them were so-called the young invisibles and over on capitol hill, house republicans continue their focus on the implementation of the law with four separate committee hearings on the affordable care act. nbc news without correspondent peter alexander joins us now. interesting to note, the president has said all along the issue of health care is about the economics as much as it is about what he sees as the right for people t
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
pulling women into the workforce like education and service sector. those are still growing but not growing so fast relative to other parts of the economy. that pulled women in. the growth of women's presence in education and higher education, increased in the '70s and 80s and plateaued sometime in the '90s, depending on which measure you look at. and then we really saw strong pattern of women entering men's occupations, especially in middle class jobs, those women, college graduates, but not so much movement the other way. women were entering professions like law and medicine or realty or educational administration that had been previously male jobs. but men weren't going into nursing and teaching preschool and elementary school -- >> let's look at some of those numbers. that is such a shocking part of your study. one in four men actually work in fields you report that are dominated 90% by males. one in three women work in fields that have 80% of women in the workplace of the your study tells the story of a professional environment in the united states where huge, huge port
is education. you have more people going to college than ever before, which means more debt, but that doesn't necessarily mean better paying jobs. we're talking about $15 to $20 an hour. do you think raising the minimum wage would have an impact on the way we at least think about education? would more people be less likely to want to go to school if they're getting paid more without having to go? >> i don't think the minimum wage has much of an impact on educational decision. i do think that college is still a good deal, but the reality is that inequality is growing even amongst those who actually go to college. the median college salary is not really keeping pace with the rest of the economy. so again, i think when thinking about the overall picture about inequality, we do need a number of different tools. i think the minimum wage plays one part of that but an important one. >> one of the arguments that corporations like mcdonald's and wendy's in particular like to make is, well, if we raise wages, then we're going to have to raise prices, and you guys don't want that and they throw out th
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
as part of ongoing efforts part of proposals private over public education and too much of a burden on teachers. joining me now president of the american federation of teachers. randy, great to see you. >> great to be with you. >> what motivated this day of action. why do you feel public education is threatened. >> actually as we've seen from the recent results, which shows the united states basically just holding its own and not moving forward, the countries of the world that outcompete us understand that public education has to be the center of education. they have to port teachers and support parents and rich curriculum including arts and music and science. that's what we're calling for here. we're one of any number of groups, student or parent, community groups that says we need a new school not fixated on testing, strategies that create winners and losers but we have to help all of our children achieve and succeed. that's why you see the largest coordinated group of action, 90 in all, set for different parts of time during the day today. >> with race to the top, one of the poli
. a low-cast accredited university that was named one of the most disruptive in education. "squawk" will be right back. [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. a confident retirement. those dreams, there's just no way we're going to let them die. ♪ like they helped millions of others. by listening. planning. working one on one. that's what ameriprise financial does. that's what they can do with you. that's how ameriprise puts more within reach. ♪ >>> looks like yesterday's trading sort of. nothing happening. but you never know. and coming up, our higher learning series continues today with two men disrupting the world of online education. the ceo of university now and the president of ed x joins us after the break. i love having a free checked bag with my unit
personal adversity and committed to philanthropy and higher education. you know who else got one this year? class of 2014, coty at honey well and jerry jones, owner of the cowboys. they're in great company with you. congratulations. that's a real honor. it's a big deal for the class of 2014. >> well, thank you for saying that joe. it is an honor. i admire the ratio society greatly. they take individuals andle challenge circumstances and give them an opportunity through scholarships to change their life through education. and to join companies not only those you mentioned but most importantly our previous winner our founder. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. >> you didn't get it yet, did you? when do they do it? >> no. the event is in april in washington d.c. >> it's a big deal. >> it's quite something. i look forward to hit. >> can congratulations. we'll check back with you on. that think about it if you see the tape. i look good in that suit. >> actually joe, when i see the ron burgundy commercial, i do think of you. i don't know why. >> i think that's a compliment? thanks m
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
deep, deep, deep cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, it's a picket. >>
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. kand i don't have time foris morunreliable companies.b angie's list definitely saves me time and money. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. >>> welcome back to "the lead." he showed the world the true meaning of resilience and during 27 years as a prisoner in his native south africa, emerging from that torment to become his country's first black president, leading his people out of the ugliness that was apartheid. we are today remembering the remarkable life of nelson m
and the courage of those educators who were on the speed of what happened. >> i went to president to newtown, and the grief was tangible. it was a physical thing you could feel. it is difficult to talk about even right now. in the last few weeks, there was an information, there was haunting details from the shooter who was clearly a young man suffering from sight mental health issues, and yet his mother, nancy lanza kept weapons in the house, took her son to the shooting range, she even planned to buy him a gun for christmas last year. she says, quote, you would want treatment for someone like that. he was isolated from everyone but his mother, and she did not have the understanding. i know it is sensitive because she is the one that he killed that day, but is that mother correct? should nancy lanza have stepped up more? >> nancy lanza probably needed help herself. and it certainly, as a parent, of four children, i can speak eternally about the challenges of parenting. not in this kind of situation, but easy to say in hindsight what she should have done. the point is what society should have
ground needs to include several things. smart deficit reduction and investments in education. we have to cut spending and it has to be fair to the middle class. if the position will be to turn off sequester which we must do, we will ask to pay to turn off sequester. that's not going to suit the democrats in congress. we will continue to negotiate and hope that we get to a good fair common ground that is good and fair of the middle class. >> when you say the middle class, what are you referencing to that they have to pay for? >> one of the things is a surcharge on airline tickets. in the context of an overall budget if we have to look at that, we should. to do that and ask middle class people who are traveling to visit with their families. this has to do better than that. >> one question i want to ask you about, when you are not on capitol hill, you moonlight to get democrats elect and get the 17 seats needed to reclaim the majority. a person who has gone out of his way to help you is the president of the united states. they say that the president has not turned down a single fund rais
-old university student said had mandela had not made those choices he would not be getting the education he is getting. so many people calling and commenting on how if mandela had not been the man that he was, this country could have very easily ended up like syria or iraq. another policeman we were speaking to this morning saying with nelson mandela's passing he felt he had lost a part of his soul and a part of his body and that he truly hopes moving forward the country and its leaders will remember what it was that this incredible man stood for. john? >> it is so remarkable. arwa damon, thank you. she brings up such a good point. words like legend don't begin to cut when twhen you deal with nelson mandela. when you're in south africa he is more than a leader and more than a legend. he's in the fabric of that nation and some one's sole they carry a piece of him around. >> a very interesting point given what we know is going on in the middle east now the connection she made the country could have ended you up differently if it wasn't for his sacrifices. >> no way inevitable there would not
're gonna give people what here to take care of the spread we would try to do more education and enforcement. >> within a few minutes, the police was on the scene and educated. >> you are not suppose to enter into right here. there is a line in the street to tell you. >> there in force in the role of the bike lanes. maligned these dedicated bike lanes are for bicyclist on less, one you are about to park and you cannot crews looking for a spot. you cannot emerge when there is a break in the by claimed similar to this. >> muni buses are not allowed to use the biplanes to keep on schedule. bike lanes, are for bikes. >> this guy gave me a piece of his mind. >> i teach a the university. i am serious about the spread i do not see you be a part of the solution. >> there you have it, he was driving e illegally and he got a ticket and he stated it was my fault. >> since no matter where you want to put the blame on, the lost a lot. maligned >> as san francisco, still the robbers, kron4 milin san fry roberts kron 4 news. >> coming up on the kron4 morning news. batkid is making his return to san francis
the questions. sallie mae also is the biggest u.s. student lender. loans to student of on education from the 2012 program for international student assessment, an exam given to 15-year-old worldwide shows the 90 students lagging in math and just average in reading. american students fail to place in the top 20 in any category. education secretary arne duncan calls the result "picture of educational stagnation coastal but added we must invest in early education, raise academic standards, and do more to notchit and obtain top- educators. top scoring teams are in singapore, south korea, japan, and hong kong. an update on the new york city ormuter train derailment reporting investigators believe the operator of the train involved in the jarrell meant on sunday fell asleep prior to the incident. william rockefeller all but admitted he dozed off. sources say he was, in their words, jolted from a sleep and hit the break. but he did not have enough time to stop the train as they headed into a curve rated for only 30 miles an hour at a speed of greater than 82 miles per hour. four people were kil
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the american dream is built on limited government and economic freedom. policies can be put in place, growth policies, tax cuts, corporate taxes being cut to get that growth going so everybody has an equal shot at prosperity. martha: let's take a look at some of these numbers. just verbally -- 1 per when asked what's the most important issue to you? 1% of the 18-29-year-olds thought that was important. jobs, unemployment rate, 7
of the dynamics here, why this is happening? are hospitals doing their part to help to educate people as far as what's going on with this? >> they are. they are working hard to let people know what the dynamic is. part of the debate has to be not just about hospitals and governors but the business communities in these places saying if we're going to be competitive, if we're doing to have a strong educated workforce that can go to work in the morning and be health y, we have to make sure we support essential hospitals in every way we can. that business community has got to step up to the plate in these states. >> doctor, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >>> coming up new details in yesterday's early morning train wreck that left four dead. we'll have an update after the break. if i can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
? >> no, she did not. she said her boys were fine, and that she was looking into education -- further education for adam. into washington, you know, they were waiting to hear back. no inclination anything was wrong or not right. >> i mean, obviously, it was a t tragedy for the family she lost her life, as well, that day but nothing can compel to the appalling horror suffers by other families. what do you as a member of the lanza family, what would you say to the families that lost their children that day and six adults killed? >> my heart goes out to each and every family that has lost a child. personally, i have lost two sons. i know what you feel. i know what you'll feel in five years from now, ten years from now. it's getting to that point of moving on from day to day, one foot in front of the other knowing that you will make it. you'll become stronger because of it. you'll never know why but you can't dwell on the bad times, fall on the good times. if you can reach out and help someone else in any way, that's part of the healing process and the ability to talk about it. if you don
's still a lot of problems. there's defacto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socioeconomic levels they are talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half hour. >>> another headline, the investigation in to she shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south
the education revolution. and coming up at 6:37 this morning, the live view from our mt. tam cam. you see the camera shaking a little bit there. it's windy. it's winter. temperatures in the low 30s to don't worry, santa will find us. ♪ [ female announcer ] this christmas, light santa's way with the hallmark santa signal ornament. and why can you move the tv out here? the wireless receiver. i got that when i switched to u-verse. but why? because it's so much better than cable. it's got more hd channels, more dvr space. yeah, but i mean, how did you know? i researched. no, i-i told you. no. yeah! no. the importan and i got you this visor. you made a visor! yes! that i'll never wear. ohh. [ male announcer ] get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for two years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. with qualifying bundles. to those who've encountered welcome to covered california. new, affordable health plans so you can be ready for whatever comes your way. enroll today at coveredca.com. >> welcome back. >> the holidays have arrived in washington, d.c. >> three, two, one! whew! >> yesterda
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
been an absolutely priceless financial education. >> you're terrific. thank you so much. i think you'll like this new book coming out in a couple of weeks. >> caller: from your book "getting back to even" i'm doing the stock replacement strategy. >> it's very complicated, but that's great. >> caller: i have december calls on disney. i have not shorted the common yet, which i should have done last week, i had great gains and i lost a lot of the gains this week. when should i short disney? >> i don't want you to. we'll get a deeper month out a few months from now. the strategy is complicated in getting back to even. disney is a buy, not a sell. i don't want you fooling around with it. when it does spike $1.50 to $2 it will flatten out later. but i think you're fine right now. steve in california. >> caller: hello there, jim. >> hey, steve. >> caller: thank you to all the home gamers from all the home gamers for making this holiday season a prosperous one. >> yes. i want everyone to do well. that's my game plan. >> caller: i appreciate you helping us make money. i love the fact you give
've been really, really happy with our education, but i feel like they just kind of leave it out because it's ssrt of like opinionated and they don't like to teach opinions in school. >> you have to be a proud dad with this book? >> i am. her stories just drive the book. what better way to connect with students than stories written by a 13-year-old. so we are really excited. as lauren said, her schools have done such a great job. they've educated her so well she was able to write most of the book at age 13. but we wanted to give the schools and parents another tool in the toolbox to help them to teach the american dream, which is part of what capitalism is all about. >> if you had to, in a nutshell, the elements discussed here and creatively brought out through the characters, what are they? you say this is capitalism. what are the points? >> lauren, you want to take a couple? >> jobs, hope, community, charity, honesty, morals. >> they're all in here. >> they all kind of tie together and form capitalism. >> we want to find a unique way to reach kids. kids are not interested in republican or
of leadership, in the case of local government, education, transportation, public safety. >> keynote speaker in hot springs, virginia is texas governor, rick perry. >>> a fire chief is sentenced to two years in jail for fraud and embezzlement. estimated at $140,000, bo taylor was the chief. prosecutors claimed he submitted false invoss for repair work and bought items on a prince william county public school credit card. >>> the u.s. park police has a new top cop. robert mcclain is the acting chief. he succeeds teresa chamber who is is retiring after 35 years in law enforcement. he most recently worked as the commander for homeland security and oversaw operations here in d.c. and new york. he's been with the park police since 1991. >>> just in time for the holidays, not one but two mystery donors come to the rescue. how they helped a church without heat. >>> we are just hours away from an easy way to get to and from baltimore on the weekends. >>> looking live at the ellipse, there she is. a beautiful tree. lit about 20 minutes ago. the show continues. we are waiting to hear from the first la
but food is medicine. we could advise people and educate people what that means. we're starting to make real dents, impact in terms of a healthier america. this idea overall it's not just about playing defense and swatting at flies and believing we are preordained to heart disease and diabetes. i was that way, too. instead, it's this idea we can't optimize ourselves and we are nowhere near that right now. none of the other stuff, would unless we focus on some of that. that's within us. that's what i meant by that. >> that's a good point. all of these points are excellent points. i want viewers to go to cnn.com, read the entire article and learn important ob potentially life-saving information. thanks very much. >>> so forget the crowds and the brawls at the stores. today, the focus shifts to online shopping. i want to tell you which retailers are pinning their hopes on a big cyber monday. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. since i'm the one who has to
, and what else can i do. you've got to look at whether it's a different type of education, a different type of training, whether it's using your skill set in a totally different way, but you've got to be accountable to yourself that you may not be as good in the field you were in as you thought you were, and you've got to try something else. melissa: let's people a couple good things to do to get started. you say connect with 15 new contacts on linkedin. does that really work? >> it really does. the key is the problem isn't people sending out linkedin invitations and having people accept them, the real issue is people get lazy, and they don't think, and they stop. once you get those connections made, you need to follow up with those people in a professional way, a phone call or an e-mail, and set up a coffee or a meeting with them just to talk and expand your network face to face. it's very easy for somebody to click the accept button and then discount you from their memory. melissa: few contacts with a total straipger, you know -- stranger, you know, linkedin -- >> well, it's not necessari
children and 6 educators in newtown, connecticut. who knows, perhaps that position will soften tomorrow when congress can hear for the first time the 911 recordings from inside sandy hook elementary on that fateful day. the connecticut state attorney has decided not to appeal last week's ruling to release the tapes, allowing them to be made public tomorrow afternoon, as planned. we'll have more on the 911 calls in tomorrow's broadcast. and while we don't know what exactly is on those recordings, maybe, just maybe, the sound of horror will force congress to think twice about gun reform in the new year. stay with us. it's mission impossible in today's top lines. don't take the bait. >> has the president signed up for obama care or the affordable care act? >> i don't have an update for you on that. i know that he will, and has said that he will. and the white house has said he will. but i don't have an update. >> do you know what he's waiting for, and when he does do that, will he make it open press? >> i'll get back to you. [ male announcer ] here's a question for you. if every u.s. home
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. cortizone-10 has the strongest nonprescription itch medicine plus moisturizers to help heal skin fast. cortizone-10. feel the heal. president obama goes on the offensive today to try to revive his signature health care reform law. the obama team spent weeks playing defense over the disastrous debut of the healthcare.gov website. next hour he kicks off a new campaign to highlight the benefits of the affordable care act. the administration plans daily events through december 23rd but convincing young people to sign up for obama care may be a tough sell. according to a brand-new gallup poll, americans aged 18 to 29 are the least familiar with the health care law. this is the main group, by the way, an the administration needs toe attract to make the whole system work. call it crisis management on a global scale. vice president biden is on a mission to ease tensions between china and japan. he and the new u.s. ambassador to japan, caroline kennedy sat down with japan's deputy prime minister taro as
and create situations in which we push not just the children, but the educators who surround them. too many of us are too comfortable with mediocrity. as a result, as michele said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped. we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> look, i could talk about this all day. i think it's a fascinating discussion. going be a real talker around the country. steve perry, michelle rhee, thank you so much. maybe we'll do this again and have more, expand on this. it's important stuff. >> talk about the future of the countries. yeah. >> thanks so much to both of you. >>> now, for some other news making headlines right now, let's take a look. hong kong is on high alert today worried about a possible outbreak of avian flu. >> you don't want to hear this. a 36-year-old indonesian domestic worker was taken to hospital after contracting the virus in critical condition from what we're told at the moment. the country has escalated the response level plan. and here's why. >> the world health organization says in the past ten years, 651
want to make you money. my job is not just to educate you, but entertain you so call me at 800-743-cnbc. with the dow seek 95 points and the s&p dropping and at one point the selling was far worse and it looked like we could be in the midst of a major rollover. still today like yesterday, the buyers and sellers did real soul-searching, and what exactly are they pondering? basically, they're trying to figure out if good news about the economy is bad news for stocks or is the opposite the case, as the economy improves should we like stocks more? it's a first-class quandary that we have to dive into headlong on "mad money" if we're going to figure out the market's move. it's distracted and a parlor game and we find you the best stocks and the best opportunities. the only focus on the fed's next move the last three years, you missed some of the single best moments to invest in our lifetimes. i regard that as terrible. i regard it as shameful because this fed-centric world presumes that the market is one big stock that is sent higher or lower by ben bernanke and janet yellin and it's the mar
. my job is not just to entertain but to educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. battle stations! that's where we are on the eve of the hugely important labor department nonfarm payroll report that comes out tomorrow morning at 8:30 a.m. the stock market is telling us to be ready. we had our fifth straight decline today. dow seeking 68 points, nasdaq declining .12%. we know that's because there's been too much good data lately. it should be that, no, good data. because we are in a good news is bad news environment. this is good news moves interest rates higher. whether the fed likes it or not! remember, the fed wants rates down as more jobs can be created. but at a certain point, you have to ask, aren't more jobs being created? the fed stops trying to keep interest rates down or stops being able to. it's a fore gone conclusion the whole stock market will decline regardless of what the fed says or does. that's been the case before even as the last late run-up t.st going to be the case again. i'm not debating that. there are tons of reasons why stocks could. we know risk-free bonds that
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> welcome back to a special edition of "new day." we start again, of course, with the passing of nelson mandela. you're looking at live pictures down in south africa. the news is sad to be sure but it is also definitely reason for celebration, because of the life and legacy of nelson mandela. people have been gathering outside his house. you will hear now singing, chanting, because remember, the greatest example of nelson mandela was the epitome of learning how to have joy in your heart even through the greatest of adversity. that's what we're seeing in south africa being echoed around the world and continuing to grow as word spreads of the passing of this great leader. we have arwa damon there outside the celebration. what's the latest from there, arwa? >> reporter: it's quite incredible to be out h
that their parents were not able to get an education. their parents were not able to ride the same buses, use the same transport that white people did. never mind employment opportunities. and they do feel a sense of responsibility they were telling us, that it is up to them, especially at this juncture in south africa's history to remind south africa's current politicians, its current government exactly what it was that any son mandela and all the others around him sacrificed for, and that was a free democratic, prosperous nation where people were treated with dignity. at the end of the day, this is still a country facing a lot of challenges and a lot of problems. >> all right. arwa damon, thank you so much. i had a chance to visit south africa in october of last year. a lot of young people still feel like he is their leader, the father of the country despite the fact there's totally new leadership at the is the one they're most influenced by, most moved by. >> it shocks a lot of people, he only served one term as president. >> it was very brief. >> he passed the mantle on to zuma. but one t
or get the education he wanted. his only goal was that i could do those things. and with nelson mandela, i could. they feel that gratitude to him and these are very young people today. it's the sense this isn't really even memories, it's the active workings of his message and work he did in his life. it's important for people to feel like this is an ongoing struggle. there's still difficulties in society here today, it's a democratic society now but there's a big gap between rich and poor. people feel they dont want that momentum he started and acted upon to be just words now. want to make sure it lives on in action. people are talking about that. people are coming here with their entire families and friends of various races and they are really making it known how they felt about nelson mandela and how they still feel about them. >> a dynamic slice of history you're going through. a lot planned in terms of memorials. what's on the schedule? >> first of all, this sunday, the president has declared it a national day of prayer and encouraging everybody to get together and have your own gat
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